Around The Scarborough Area...

North York Moors National Park...

The North York Moors became a National Park on 28 November 1952 and is one of 15 National Parks in the United Kingdom. It covers an area of 554 square miles (1,436 square kilometres) and has 26 miles of coastline. There are 1,408 miles (2,268km) of Public Rights of Way in the National Park. The 109 mile (176km) Cleveland Way National Trail forms a horseshoe around the North York Moors starting in Helmsley and finishing in Filey.


The highest point in the North York Moors is Urra Moor at 454 metres.
It contains the largest expanse of heather moorland in England and Wales covering an area of over 44,000 hectares or around one third of the National Park. The North York Moors is a European Special Protection Area for merlin and golden plover and is internationally renowned as a haven for ground nesting birds.


It is home to the most northerly colony of the Duke of Burgundy butterfly in Britain and the southernmost place for the dwarf cornel.largest concentrations of ancient and veteran trees in northern England.

Whitby...

Whitby is famous for many things, one being the beautiful 13th century Abbey which dominates the town from its cliff top position. This is also where Captain Cook sailed from on his voyages across the world. The 199 steps lead up from the Old Town to the parish church of St. Mary’s, the churchyard here gave Bram Stoker the inspiration to write his world famous Dracula book. The town often has ‘Goth’ weekends and there is a Dracula museum. The town is built around the River Esk and borders the North Yorkshire Moors National Park and has an award-winning beach beneath the West Cliff. The Whitby Pavillion has entertainment throughout the year.

Filey...

Filey is a small, traditional seaside resort, just 7 miles south of Scarborough. The atmosphere is very relaxed and is the perfect destination for a pleasant family day out. Find a safe, sandy beach and a lovely promenade with stalls, mini golf, paddling pool and the famous cobble landing. Just to the north is Filey Brigg, a narrow headland, just a few yards wide in places which reaches out into the North Sea like a tail. At low tide, an escarpment of rocks reaches a mile out to sea. This has been the final destination for many boats and ships over the years. Well worth a visit, but check the tide times if you venture out onto the rocks.

Dalby forest...

Dalby: The Great Yorkshire Forest is a stunning place to spend a full day. Explore mile upon mile of hilly forest and some really special beauty spots like Adderstone Rock, The Bridestones, giant rocks which stick out of the heather moorland and attractions like Go Ape and the Visitor Centre. It's one of the best places in the UK to cycle with miles of tracks and special bike parks. Dalby Forest usually hosts summer concerts too. Bear in mind there is a toll but that does include parking for the day.

Robin Hood's Bay...

A village which clings to the steep cliffs with “secret streets” which were home to smugglers many moons ago. This is where the moors meet the coast in spectacular fashion and where you’ll find one of Britain’s greatest villages. This is also the end point of the Coast to Coast walk and what a treat for those who complete the route. But here it’s not just about the spectacular coastline, the narrow streets just a few feet wide some of them, are the real attraction. Get lost here and while and you too will come under its spell!

Flamborough Head...

Chalk cliffs reach out into the North Sea at Flamborough Head. The headland is famous for its numerous bays and tiny coves with deep caves carved into the cliffs. Some you can walk in at low tide, or Kayak in at high tide. In calm weather, the water can look tropical with the clear water showing off the chalk sea bed. You can often see Seals bobbing up and down or maybe a Porpoise or even a Whale. Flamborough Lighthouse stands proud at the end of the headland with guided tours available. Nearby the old lighthouse, the oldest standing in the UK.

Bempton Cliffs...

The RSPB Reserve is set on the Flamborough Headland and is one of the most spectacular coastal locations in the UK, with chalk cliffs which rise to 330ft in places. It is also home to one of the country's largest colonies of seabirds. Here you can find Gannets, Puffins, Guiilemots, Kittiwakes and Fulmars. The best time of year to visit is probably early summer. The Reserve is accessed from Bempton Village on the Reighton to Flamborough road. Reighton is on the A165 Scarborough to Bridlington road.

Staithes...

Staithes is famous for many things. It is set in a stunning location, a river winds its way through a gorge and into a small harbour, once one of the north's premier fishing ports. The cliffs, narrow streets and picturesque houses create a scene which attracts many artists to the area. This is also a village Captain Cook called home for a short time. He worked in a grocers as an assistant and here he fell in love with the sea. Ironically that shop was lost to the sea but you can see "Captain Cook's Cottage" where many artefacts from it are stored.

Hayburn Wyke...

This is a National Trust woodland which winds its way down to a cove of incredible beauty. Totally natural with nothing but nature in sight, a waterfall cascades over the top of the cliff and onto the pebbles below. Access is from the Hayburn Wyke Inn road, which is off the Scarborough to Ravenscar road. The path through the woods is uneven in places and steep at times but well worth the effort to enjoy one of the most unspoilt, unchanges views on any coast anywhere!

Runswick Bay...

Runswick Bay is a hidden gem, off the tourist trail but no less stunning than Robin Hood's Bay or Staithes. In fact they call this "one of england's most beautiful bays" and we wouldn't argue. The houses cling to a headland which protects them from the worst the northerly winds can throw at them in the winter, but in the 1600's a great storm washed away all but one house. Bizarrely it was a house of a dead man who's wake was taking place there that very night! Explore narrow streets and follow in the footsteps of smugglers and take a walk on the sandy beach.

Falling Foss Waterfall...

Falling Foss is a stunning waterfall in a deep gorge hidden beautifully in the woods in the North York Moors National Park but surprisingly accesible from the A171 Scarborough to Whitby road. There are walks which meander along the course of the stream through the woodland. At the top of the waterfall there is a house which doubles up as an outdoor cafe. Bridges cross the stream. A real hidden gem.

The Esk Valley...

The Esk Valley is full of beautiful moorland villages like Egton Bridge and its stepping stones, Glaisdale and its historic bridge, built to bring two lovers together in the 1600's. The River Esk winds its way towards Whitby through Grosmont, home to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. Also worth visiting are Lealholm and attractions on the riverside at Ruswarp.

York...

York is a beautiful, historic walled city just 40 miles from Scarborough and easily accessed from the A64 by road or from Scarborough and Seamer stations on the train. Allow an hour for the drive. The train takes just over 40 minutes. Walk the city walls, take a river boat along the River Ouse, viit the famous Minster or visit attractions like The National Railway Museum. 

Bridlington...

Bridlington is 18 miles south of Scarborough and features two fantastic award-winning beaches, an historic harbour, large seaside fair and attractions like Bridlington Spa, East Riding Leisure Bridlington, Bondville Miniature Village, Bridlington Bird and Animal Park and Sewerby Hall & Gardens. THere are also fantastic views to be had of Flamborough Head. A must-see is the Old Town which is almost 2 miles outside of the main town centre. Its high street was featured in the Dad's Army film.

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